‘Austerity’ and ‘Social Security’ are two of the most dangerous words in American politics

  • September 26, 2021

It’s a phrase that could have been uttered by a Republican lawmaker during a Republican primary debate, but for the recent election of a president with no party affiliation.

It’s the phrase used by Republicans to attack Democrats for raising taxes on the middle class, and it’s one of the defining phrases in the 2016 presidential race.

The phrase has become so politically toxic that it was even used by President Donald Trump during his speech to Congress on Tuesday night.

Trump told lawmakers he wanted to increase the federal minimum wage, the same day he signed a bill to roll back the Obama-era healthcare law.

And he used the phrase in his speech about the opioid epidemic, which has cost the U.S. over 300,000 lives in the past year.

The rise of Trump’s populist message came after the election of President Joe Biden in 2016, and the phrase became an effective tool to attack the Democrats on issues like trade, health care, taxes and the environment.

But what exactly is a “middle class tax cut”?

The term is used to describe the minimum wage increase and the phase-in of the COVID-19 tax credit, which are the two key components of the Trump tax plan.

The phrase “middle income tax cut” has become an easy shorthand to use to describe a tax cut for Americans earning between about $40,000 and $90,000 per year.

“It’s an easy-to-pronounce phrase,” said Richard Vedder, a professor of politics at George Mason University.

“People can easily use it to make a point or a political point without having to say it in the same sentence.

It is used by many Republicans and Democrats in this campaign.”

Vedder said the phrase was coined by Republicans like Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., and Sen. Ted Cruz, R.

Tex., during the 2016 election.

They used it to attack Hillary Clinton for the 2016 Democratic presidential primary, when she had a lower vote total than Donald Trump.

The two Republicans made the phrase an easy target for Trump, who used it during the campaign as a way to criticize the Democratic Party and its policies, such as the Affordable Care Act.

The Democrats were accused of trying to dismantle the ACA and roll back Social Security.

In a press conference Tuesday night, Collins said the tax cuts were an extension of the Obama stimulus.

Collins said they were part of the “big, beautiful, massive, massive American recovery program” that was designed to boost the economy and create jobs.

He said that the tax cut would help “the middle class” and help families with children.

“We will get rid of this huge, huge stimulus that was passed in 2011,” Collins said.

“And I am going to repeal the stimulus.

We are going to cut taxes for the middle-class.”

But Vedder said Collins was using a word that was used in a different context.

“I think what Collins was saying is, the American people are going through the same pain they’re going through now and we’re going to get rid the stimulus that they’re experiencing,” he said.

Collins is not the only Republican who has used the term in this election cycle.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R, Fla., has used it frequently, saying it will “cut taxes for those making between $50,000 to $100,000.”

Rubio also called the phrase “austerity” in a tweet, and his running mate, former Florida Gov.

Jeb Bush, used the same phrase during the presidential campaign.

“You don’t have to be a Democrat to see the potential of this word.

It could be used as a dirty word for Republicans and liberals alike,” said Vedder.

“We don’t want to have the word ‘austerity’ being used to insult those on the margins of society, and that’s the kind of thing that is likely to get people hurt and hurt them.”

But not everyone is taking Collins’ attack on the phrase seriously.

Rep. Kevin Brady, R of Texas, said he would use the phrase only as a metaphor.

“Let’s not be too quick to label it ‘a middle-income tax cut,’ as if it’s a policy proposal,” Brady said.

“And let’s also not forget the phrase ‘a conservative budget’ is used in the Republican Party’s platform to describe how we would cut taxes and spending, and I think it’s important to point out that that doesn’t mean we’re necessarily going to increase taxes on anyone.”

In a statement, Collins’ office said the “Republican Party has never used the word austerity as a political slogan.”

“The phrase ‘middle income’ has been a rallying cry for the Republicans for decades and we will continue to use it in that context,” the statement said.

The Trump administration has been very clear that it supports the tax bill and the health care reform legislation, and is committed to rolling